How an Economy Grows and Why It Doesn't

Unknown year Economics 1.98K Views 2 Comments
This book superbly explains economics in a simple and easy to understand comic book format, it's a work of genius which if read and understood by everyone would restore economic freedom and prosperity practically overnight.

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  • Almbixbooks 4 years ago

    This ignores some basic stuff.  He lost me when B and C begged to use A's net.  My first thought was, "Here, but please don't break it."  Altrusim.  Society-building.  Kindness.  Most people have these virtues.  Too bad these guys don't.

    Second.  Building nets is fine when you're just A, B and C on your little island.  But what about when you've got fossil fuels which allow you to travel the wide oceans, stay out for weeks or months (with refrigeration, food preservation) and fish the oceans empty (or 90% empty, which is what man has done in a bit over 100 years.)  What do you do then?  Nope, don't start an economy.  It leads INEXORABLY to the trashing of our resource base and the loss of simple, society-building human values. 

    But he's right, that's how economy works.  Let's get rid of it before we all die.

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  • Guest 5 years ago

    1) contrary to popular, cultural myth and mantra, you can't have infinite growth on a finite planet.

    we're not going to grow, consume, indebt and complicate our way out of the problems of growth, consumption, debt and complexity.

    2) economics is not a science:

    http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/rushkoff09/rushkoff09_index.html

    3) "After what I have seen in Spain I have come to the conclusion that it is futile to be 'anti-Fascist' while attempting to preserve capitalism. Fascism after all is only a development of capitalism, and the mildest democracy, so-called, is liable to turn into Fascism when the pinch comes. We like to think of England as a democratic country, but our rule in India, for instance, is just as bad as German Fascism, though outwardly it may be less irritating. I do not see how one can oppose Fascism except by working for the overthrow of capitalism, starting, of course, in one’s own country. If one collaborates with a capitalist-imperialist government in a struggle 'against' Fascism, i.e. against a rival imperialism, one is simply letting fascism in by the back door."
    - George Orwell

    "Where I part company from him [Franz Borkenau] is where he says that for the western democracies the choice lies between Fascism and an orderly reconstruction through the cooperation of all classes. I do not believe in the second possibility, because I do not believe that a man with £50,000 a year and a man with fifteen shillings a week either can, or will, co-operate. The Nature of their relationship is quite simply, that the one is robbing the other, and there is no reason to think the robber will suddenly turn over a new leaf. It would seem, therefore, that if the problems of western capitalism are to be solved, it will have to be through a third alternative, a movement which is genuinely revolutionary, i.e. willing to make drastic changes and to use violence if necessary, but which does not lose touch, as Communism and Fascism have done, with the essential values of democracy. Such a thing is by no means unthinkable. The germs of such a movement exist in numerous countries, and they are capable of growing. At any rate, if they don’t, there is no real exit from the pigsty we are in."
    - George Orwell

    4) "His [Ernst Mayr] argument was, you’re just not going to find intelligent life elsewhere, and you probably won’t find it here for very long either because it’s just a lethal mutation. He also added, a little bit ominously, that the average life span of a species, of the billions that have existed, is about 100,000 years, which is roughly the length of time that modern humans have existed.

    "With the environmental crisis, we’re now in a situation where we can decide whether Mayr was right or not. If nothing significant is done about it, and pretty quickly, then he will have been correct: human intelligence is indeed a lethal mutation. Maybe some humans will survive, but it will be scattered and nothing like a decent existence, and we’ll take a lot of the rest of the living world along with us."
    - Noam Chomsky

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