Afghanistan: Behind Enemy Lines

Unknown year Military & War 1.68K Views 0 Comments
A new frontline has opened in Afghanistan. Thousands of Taliban and mujahedin soldiers have moved into the north of the country, further stretching the ISAF forces’ attempts to contain the insurgency. They aim to take over the countryside surrounding the towns and cities, and block the main supply route, the Kunduz-Baghlan road, which services coalition troops across Afghanistan.

Award-winning Afghan reporter Najibullah Quraishi spent 10 days with the Central Group of fighters, known to be among the most dangerous and fanatical factions involved in the war, with Chechens, Arabs and other foreign fighters in their ranks and with close links to Al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden. He captures their leisure time, training and bomb-making. He even joins them as they conduct an operation to attack tanks and convoys on the road.

But the true nature of the insurgency emerges as the real day-to-day life of men who (claim to) dream only of martyrdom is uncovered for the first time. They talk willingly of giving their lives to defeat the infidels and kofaar (non-believers), but at the same time complain about the cold, the boredom and danger as they lie in wait for targets. And they argue amongst each other and with their commanders when things go wrong.

While most new troops stationed in Afghanistan head to the volatile south of the country, a new frontline, operating almost under the radar of NATO, is encircling the north of the country.

The insurgents are aiming to take over the countryside surrounding the towns and cities and to block the main supply route, the Kunduz-Baghlan road, which services coalition troops across much of Afghanistan since the traditional route through Pakistan became too treacherous.

Dispatches goes inside the enemy camp in northern Afghanistan as award-winning Afghan reporter Najibullah Quraishi is granted access to an army of extreme Islamic combatants.

Quraishi spent almost two weeks with the Central Group of fighters, known to be among the most dangerous and fanatical factions involved in the war, with Chechens, Arabs and other foreign fighters in their ranks and with close links to Al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden. He captures their leisure time, training and planning and accompanies them on an operation targeting the Afghan army.

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