9/11: The Falling Man

Unknown year 9/11 3.88K Views 4 Comments
<div id="_mcePaste">"The Falling Man" is a nickname given to a man who fell from the North Tower of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks in New York City, and is also the title of a photograph, magazine story and documentary film about the incident. The photo was taken by Richard Drew at 9:41:15 a.m. on September 11, 2001. The story, written by Tom Junod, appeared in the September 2003 issue of Esquire magazine, and was later made into a film.</div>
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<div id="_mcePaste">The subject of the image — whose identity remains uncertain, although attempts have been made to identify him — was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently chose to jump rather than die from the fire and smoke. As many as 200 people jumped to their deaths that day; there was no time to recover or identify those who jumped prior to the collapse of the towers. Officially, all deaths in the attacks except those of the hijackers were ruled to be homicides (as opposed to suicides), and the New York City medical examiner's office stated that it does not classify the people who fell to their deaths on September 11 as "jumpers": "A 'jumper' is somebody who goes to the office in the morning knowing that they will commit suicide... These people were forced out by the smoke and flames or blown out."</div>
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<div id="_mcePaste">This picture is somewhat deceptive; it gives the impression the man is falling straight down. In reality, this is just one of a dozen photographs of his fall. In the other photos, it is evident that he is tumbling through the air out of control.</div>
<div id="_mcePaste">The photographer has noted that, in at least two cases, newspaper stories commenting on the image have attracted a barrage of criticism from readers who found the image disturbing.</div>
"The Falling Man" is a nickname given to a man who fell from the North Tower of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks in New York City, and is also the title of a photograph, magazine story and documentary film about the incident. The photo was taken by Richard Drew at 9:41:15 a.m. on September 11, 2001. The story, written by Tom Junod, appeared in the September 2003 issue of Esquire magazine, and was later made into a film.The subject of the image — whose identity remains uncertain, although attempts have been made to identify him — was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently chose to jump rather than die from the fire and smoke. As many as 200 people jumped to their deaths that day; there was no time to recover or identify those who jumped prior to the collapse of the towers. Officially, all deaths in the attacks except those of the hijackers were ruled to be homicides (as opposed to suicides), and the New York City medical examiner's office stated that it does not classify the people who fell to their deaths on September 11 as "jumpers": "A 'jumper' is somebody who goes to the office in the morning knowing that they will commit suicide... These people were forced out by the smoke and flames or blown out."[1]This picture is somewhat deceptive; it gives the impression the man is falling straight down. In reality, this is just one of a dozen photographs of his fall. In the other photos, it is evident that he is tumbling through the air out of control.The photographer has noted that, in at least two cases, newspaper stories commenting on the image have attracted a barrage of criticism from readers who found the image disturbing.

9/11: The Falling Man is a 2006 documentary film about the picture and the story behind it.  It was made by American filmmaker Henry Singer and filmed by Richard Numeroff, a New York-based director of photography. The film is loosely based on Junod's Esquire story. It also drew its material from photographer Lyle Owerko's pictures of falling people. It debuted on March 16, 2006, on the British television network Channel 4. It later made its North American premiere on Canada's CBC Newsworld on September 6, 2006, and has been broadcast in over 30 countries. The U.S. premiere was September 10, 2007, on the Discovery Times Channel.

4 Comments

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  • Vaevictus 5 years ago

    9/11 was an inside job, dont try to brainwash the poor people in USA and around the world. Enough is enough.

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  • Vaevictus 5 years ago

    9/11 was an inside job, dont try to brainwash the poor people in USA and around the world. Enough is enough.

    1
  • I stopped at that Chef and the tear jerker music behind it. I think this Doc is BS, from a quick short impression.

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  • Loki Lyesmyth 6 years ago

    What about the Explosions? What about all the reports of EXPLOSIONS prior to second plane hit and at the base of building? What about building 7 being "pulled"? Good documentary but not all the facts are here and anyone should dig deeper. 911 was an inside job.

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